FCPX Change audio connection point

Connection point before adjustment
Connection point before adjustment

Changing Audio Connection in FCPX

Changing the connection point of the audio to a clip in FCPX is easy. That is, once you know how to do it. If not, you’re always guessing where the connection will end up and it’s a problem. To change the connection point of an audio clip, all you do is press

COMMAND+OPT and click on the audio track you want to connect under the video clip you want to connect it to. That’s it.

Connection point after adjustment
Connection point after adjustment

Fixed timelines

Along the same theme, perhaps you need to lock something into position in FCPX. At first, it doesn’t seem possible with the magnetic timeline. Apple giveth, Apple taketh away.

One of the difficulties in understanding how FCPX works is that the magnetic timeline is always floating. At first this seems irritating, as you might want to lock your piece of media at an exact time in the timeline. You can’t directly do that in FCPX. But what you can do is use the Place tool, slide things around and create a gap.

Position tool
Position tool

Then, in the gap, you create a sub-timeline or child timeline and edit in there. That way your main timeline stays fixed but you can work inside of your fixed time, say for a commercial spot or such.

We rarely use the position tool, as the select tool is generally much more powerful and (somewhat) non-destructive. But when you need to place a clip at an exact point, the position tool is what you want.

We’re working on the final editing stages of Antarctic Tears the film and it doesn’t have a fixed time space, but once or twice both the audio connection point and the position tool have come in very handy. FCPX is quite powerful but it can be mystifying when you’re not sure about a “secret” keystroke.

Recording voice overs

AT2035 in case
AT2035 in case

Recording voice overs isn’t as simple as it seems. Apple would have you believe you can just hook your ear buds into the computer, click the Record Voice Over in Final Cut Pro X and everything will be good. Only if you want room noise, the dog next door barking, and lots of static hiss to ruin your otherwise good film.

How about the built in microphone on your $4,000 Macbook Retina? Only if you want to record fan noise, your keyboard strokes and who knows what else.

No, you have to go to some effort to get good audio and a great deal of effort to get excellent audio. People spend a lot of money on it! How do you make a basic voice over that sounds decent?

  • Buy a great mic
  • Buy an awesome audio recorder
  • Build a sound booth [you’re an audio engineer, right?]

10k later, you’ll be set for your first audio book. Maybe.

OR

Don’t believe it? Here are 2 audio samples of what you’ll get if you chose

A bad recording location: Wood floors, cathedral ceiling, lots of windows. This was recorded directly into a Zoom H4n into the stereo mics

[sc_embed_player fileurl=”http://tvlvideo.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/zoom-h4n-in-room.mp3″]

You can hear the room echo. It’s terrible and makes the voice over difficult to hear.

Now, listen to this audio recorded on a Audio Technica AT2035 connected to the Zoom H4n in mono mode (mono input mode makes it possible to use a single microphone and record on both stereo tracks).

[sc_embed_player fileurl=”http://tvlvideo.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/AT2035-in-sound-booth.mp3″]

You can hear the voice, it’s clear and there’s no high or low frequency echo. Would this be better if it were recorded on a Schoeps CMC641G microphone? Sure! But you’ll be set back $2000 or more just for the microphone.